A Hume

A Hume
How to Dress for Spring

How to Dress for Spring

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Our motto for Spring dressing is be stylish, be fresh and be prepared.

 

British weather is notoriously unpredictable, especially during spring, one minute you’re basking in glad and glorious sunshine and the next battling easterly winds blowing like icy daggers through your clothes.

 

It’s so easy to get caught out. Too hot and you’re a shiny faced embarrassment of damp patches and a smell waiting to happen. Too cold and you’re a rictus faced picture of clench jawed endurance.

 

Read the weather wrong and it can seriously undermine your comfort and enjoyment of the day.

 

 

Layering and Fabric

 

Thankfully there are few simple things you can do to ease your passage through spring and on into the summer months, when – let’s face it – not much will change….

 

….best pay attention then, because you’ll most likely be following this style advice from now until the end of September.

 

 

Layers – Shed the Winter Coat

 

The first piece of advice is hardly breaking news and we’d be surprised if you haven’t cracked it already. However it’s worth re-stating as what is surprising is how often we forget the things we know and how frequently we fail to do the things we know we should.

 

If for the past five cold, dark months you’ve been unhooking the same winter weight coat as you leave the house it can be a hard habit to break. If you’re not careful you can find yourself sitting on the train in your ¾ length Crombie at the end of April next to a girl in sandals and a summer frock.

 

You’ve been caught. Stranded out of season.

 

 

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To avoid this we would suggest that now is about the right time to shed the winter coat. But instead of simply shedding that heavy outer layer, replace it with several lighter layers.

 

Not only will the lighter layers look more fitting for the season but they can be peeled on and off as the weather swings with manic glee from sub-zero to sub-tropical.

 

Fabric – Sweaty Fibres are Foe, Not Friend

 

Our second pearl of wardrobe wisdom is beware of sweaty fibres. Actually it’s not so much the fibres that sweat, as the fibres that cause you to sweat, especially when caught unawares during an upward barometric swing.

Synthetic fibres, and this includes the pervasive polycotton mix, do not allow your body to breathe. Meaning any body heat and perspiration you generate will be trapped beneath your clothes increasing the production of sweat as your body desperately tries to cool down. It doesn’t take much for this cycle to kick in, just a temperature hike of a few degrees or a spot of mild exertion like climbing some stairs. Cue damp patches and discomfort.

 

 

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Much better to stick to natural fibres that allow your body to breath. 100% cotton shirts not only allow your body to better regulate its temperature when the weather is warm but also help your body to retain heat when it’s cold. Win win.

 

Fabric Weight and Fit

 

If you are at all conscious of overheating then opt for a looser fit. This applies to trousers, jeans and chinos, as well as shirts, polos and t-shirts.

 

A slightly more generous fit will allow the air to circulate.

 

 

 

It’s ok to still wear fabrics such as moleskin but consider a mid-weight pair such as the 11 oz RM Williams Lugarno rather than the 15oz belters that kept you warm through winter.

 

The same applies to jeans and chinos, look for 10 – 12 oz weights.

 

 

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Follow these few simple rules and you’ll be stylish and comfortable, and able to keep up with the British climate.

 

 

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